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Hello and welcome to Tom Hiddleston Fan! We are a fansite dedicated to Golden Globe award winning English actor, Tom Hiddleston. You may know Tom from his work as Loki in the Marvel Cinematic Universe and for the critically acclaimed, limited series, The Night Manager. Here at Tom Hiddleston Fan we strive to connect with Tom fans all over the world by delivering comprehensive content on all things Tom Hiddleston! We want to thank you for visiting and hope you come and give us a visit back soon.


Posted by Hunter on April 26th, 2016

Tom Hiddleston Explains ‘”Very Important” Nude Scene in High-Rise

Tom Hiddleston’s butt may have its own hashtag, #Hiddlesbum, but the actor doesn’t strip down just so his impressive backside can trend on social media.

In his new indie High-Rise, he plays a doctor who moves into an apartment building that turns out to be full of all sorts of crazy neighbors and shenanigans. “He moves into the building to get away from the entanglements of real life,” Hiddleston told E! News at the Tribeca Film Festival. “He’s excited by the anonymity of the building.”

But he learns his privacy isn’t so sacred when a neighbor (Sienna Miller) spies him sunbathing in the nude. And yes, that’s when we get a peek at Tom’s buttocks.

The scene is actually in the 1975 novel that the movie is based on, High-Rise by J.G. Ballard. “And [director] Ben Wheatley and Amy Jump, the screenwriter, thought it was very important to do so I had not problem doing it,” Hiddleston said.

Miller laughed when we told her about #Hiddlesbum. “That’s so funny,” she said.

But she admits that nudity on camera is never comfortable for most actors. “[Tom] doesn’t love it but he’s also very good at his job and professional so if the script calls for it, he will get his Hiddlesbum out,” Miller explained.

High-Rise is available on VOD, iTunes, and Amazon Video on April 28 followed by a theatrical release on May 13.

Hiddleston was teased about #Hiddlesbum while appearing late last month on The Late Show With Stephen Colbert while talking about him dropping his pants on his new AMC series The Night Manager.

Hiddleston told Colbert that he’s OK with nudity because he “trained” for it while studying acting at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts. “There’s no class in #Hiddlesbum at RADA,” he joked. “Actually…there’s always a moment in training where you’re given a role where you have to be comfortable with nakedness. I think they see it as part of the training.”

Source



Posted by Hunter on March 14th, 2016

High-Rise Review from Empire Magazine

Review from Empire Magazine, since the movie is coming out on the UK this weekend.

Neurologist Dr. Laing (Hiddleston) moves into a pristine tower block in the shiny 1970s, only to see the new society crumble into age-old violence. ★★★★

While J.G. Ballard is seven years gone, and the source for this film 40 years old, it still feels alarmingly now. The future he imagined in the 1970s, with its affluenza and anger, couldn’t feel more relevant today.

Ballard’s book was published in the year Margaret Thatcher became leader of the Conservative Party, before the Winter Of Discontent saw rubbish rotting on British streets amid industrial disputes, before greed became nakedly good. But the novel seemed to foresee all that was to come, and the first of the many smart decisions in this pungent adaptation is to maintain its period setting. It must have been tempting to modernise it. But as ridiculous as the cars, lapels and shagpile sideburns are, retaining the novel’s era grants High-Rise a compelling air of tragedy. The people in this tower block are buying a bit of the future, but they’re never going to escape the past.

Although designed to be exciting and people-friendly, the brutalist architecture of post-War regeneration came to represent ugly failure. High-Rise captures the excitement of that sleek, new way of living, and then takes malicious delight in its destruction. This film is both beautiful and grubby; it bathes your eyes but leaves a sticky residue. From the ethereal elegance of an aristocratic French fancy-dress party (costumes wrapped around warped souls), to the lithe musculature of a naked Hiddleston, to the striking image of his paint-splattered face — as if Dulux made an STD commercial — it is crammed with dreamlike (or at times nightmarish) moments. The chilly eroticism is familiar from producer Jeremy Thomas’ other Ballard adaptation, Crash, but this is more anarchic than Cronenberg’s controversial cult classic.

This is a strength and weakness. By staying so faithful to the material, screenwriter Amy Jump and director Ben Wheatley capture its spirit without quite making High-Rise consistently gripping as a story. Once we are firmly established with the concrete erection and its dubious denizens, incident upon incident of unpleasantness pile up to become almost monotonous. But it’s hard to know how one could wrestle Ballard’s book into a conventional thriller without losing the jagged edge that buries it in the mind. And Wheatley and DP Laurie Rose conjure such restless, arresting images that even if your attention to the plot wanders, you will still want to watch.

Wheatley doesn’t allow the larger scale — this must be his biggest-budget picture by millions — to blunt the unpredictability and energy he showed in Kill List et al. Hiddleston, highest-profile star yet, manages a very tricky balancing act, as the cool observer drawn deeper — or higher — into mayhem, while Sienna Miller’s seductive aide and Luke Evans’ bolshy filmmaker are wonderfully unrepentant. This is a dazzling, troubling, ugly and unsettling film. Ballardian, then: fucked up and up and up.



Posted by Hunter on March 14th, 2016

High-Rise: is Ben Wheatley’s latest the best JG Ballard adaptation yet?

Finally, someone has found a way to adapt JG Ballard successfully for the cinema. Until now he was better suited to providing excellent band names (Comsat Angels) or grim song titles (Atrocity Exhibition) for 1970s-80s post-punk bands. Ballard’s work defiantly resists adaptation. He is an obsessive and an imagist. He doesn’t do plot, he just examines his nightmarish scenarios and mentally collapsing protagonists from every conceivable angle, rather than offering neatly structured climaxes. His dialogue is functional. In conventional outer space sci-fi you can have fun with spaceships, ray-guns and special effects, but Ballard’s “inner space” is far harder to capture.

Why JG Ballard’s High-Rise takes dystopian science fiction to a new level
Read more
High-Rise, the most outwardly conventional of Ballard’s 70s steel-and-glass novels, has famously been a property in development ever since it was published, attracting and defeating numerous adapters. Too many of these involved screenwriters superimposing their own ideas upon Ballard’s scenario and killing its internal balance. Ben Wheatley and his partner-editor-scenarist Amy Jump, however, have made several decisions that honour both the novel of 1975 and the cinematic needs of 2016. Firstly, they set the movie in its original period, the mid-70s, in the aftermath of Ernő Goldfinger, the Ronan Point collapse, brutalism and the sorrowful postwar migration from backstreet slums to suburbs in the sky. They have not unnecessarily filled in Ballard’s vacant characters, instead allowing the collective psychosis that grips the high-rise to remain the film’s protagonist. As a handyman puts it: “I don’t work for you, I work for the building.”

he pair also understand that Ballard was, first and foremost, a sublime imagist and they pack every frame with their own audacious pictorialism. Much of it partakes freely of the great British movies of the period, an age of big, mad projects financed by the last US studio money then remaining in Britain. Think of Ken Russell at his Tommy/Lisztomania high tide, or Nicolas Roeg’s menacing reds. Recall the queasy insanity of Lindsay Anderson’s O Lucky Man! and Britannia Hospital; Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange; or those psycho-house movies that bookend the 1960s, The Servant and Performance. And, at a distance, remember Cronenberg’s contemporaneous Shivers (1975), filmed in Montreal’s minatory Nuns’ Island apartment complex, designed by Mies van der Rohe; or the Gropiusstadt of 60s Berlin, which gave us both Christiane F and Bowie’s Neuköln. And, oh yes, Pasolini’s The 120 Days Of Sodom, just for good measure.

A single viewing of High-Rise does not let it settle quietly in the mind. I expect to mine it 10 more times. For now, I know this: in Ben Wheatley and Amy Jump, 21st-century Britain has found its postmodern Powell and Pressburger.

High-Rise is released in cinemas on 18 March

Source



Posted by Hunter on March 12th, 2016

High Rise Posters & Stills

Here are Posters and stills from High Rise, which will be available on Demand, on Amazon Video and on iTunes April 28th and in Theatres May 13th.




Gallery Links:



Posted by Hunter on March 12th, 2016

Tom Hiddleston Learns About the Indulgences of ‘High-Rise’ Living in New Clip (Video)

A new clip for Ben Wheatley‘s psycho sociopolitical satire High-Rise has hit the web, and it’s about as far out as you’d expect. With a steady stream of films since his excellent 2009 feature debut Down Terrace, Wheatley has established himself as one of the most fearlessly odd and consistently unpredictable filmmakers on the market. His skewed sense of humor, a penchant for moments of ultra-violence, and general head-tripping panache can make his films a bit challenging at times, the reward is always a singular cinematic experience.

Wheatley looks to be in peak form with High-Rise. Adapted from J.G. Ballard’s classic novel, the film stars Tom Hiddleston as Dr. Robert Laing, a man seeking quiet and anonymity in his new apartment who finds his bizarre collection of neighbors aren’t too keen to leave him well enough alone. Thanks to the indulgent lifestyle within the ultra-modern compound and a simmering threat of class warfare between the upper and lower floors, Laing finds himself headed down a debauched path of questionable sanity.

Also starring Jeremy Irons, Sienna Miller, Luke Evans, Elisabeth Moss, James Purefoy, and Sienna Guillory, High-Rise is due out in US theaters May 13th.

Via Collider.



Posted by Hunter on March 10th, 2016

Watch an exclusive clip from the new high rise film adaption from i-D

The film adaption of High Rise couldn’t have come at a better time. As the questionable ethics of London’s ever-growing number of luxury flats continues to dominate the conversation around the capital’s future, J.G. Ballard’s titular high rise, built from concrete, steel and a solid foundation of social hierarchy, feels uncomfortably familiar. Starring Tom Hiddleston, Jeremy Irons, Elisabeth Moss, Sienna Miller and Luke Evans, the Ben Wheatley epic hits screens March 18th in the UK. Here, as Hiddleston’s Dr. Robert Laing attends his first social event in the high rise, get a taste of the dark undertones and class tensions the film explores.

Via: i-D.com



Posted by Hunter on December 14th, 2015

First Trailer for High Rise Trailer

The first trailer for High Rise has been released.


Current Projects
Earth at Night in Color (2020)

Tom as Narrator

Next-generation cameras reveal the nocturnal lives of animals across six continents, from the Arctic Circle to the African grasslands. Narrated by Tom Hiddleston. The moonlit dramas of animals at night, revealing new insights and never before seen behaviors.
Loki (2021)

Tom as Loki

Takes place after Avengers: Endgame, which saw Loki steal the Tesseract during the 2012 events of The Avengers (2012), which created an alternate timeline from the main MCU films. In the series, Loki uses the Tesseract to travel through time and alter human history.
White Stork (2022)

Tom as James Cooper

Netflix drama series revolving around aspiring politician, James Cooper who tries to keep his dark past a secret before he runs for a seat in Parliament.
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