admin / November 17th, 2018

It all started on Wednesday afternoon, when Tom Hiddleston tweeted a minute-long wordless video to his 3.5 million followers. In it, the star of The Night Manager, strolls into focus in the Leake Street Arches underneath Waterloo station. Bearded, hair pushed back like a sexy professor, wearing suit but no tie, he looked at the camera with undigested sadness. Then the word “Betrayal” filled the screen. More from The Telegraph:

Tom Hiddleston is to return to the London stage in a new production of Betrayal, considered one of Harold Pinter’s greatest plays.

Hiddleston was a hugely accomplished stage actor before making his name in Hollywood as Loki in the Marvel comic book films, and on television in the BBC’s The Night Manager.

On Thursday, 40 years after the first performances of the play at the National Theatre, the Jamie Lloyd Company announced Betrayal would run from March to June next year.

It will be the culmination of Lloyd’s successful Pinter at the Pinter season, which has seen all of the playwright’s one-act plays performed at the theatre which bears his name, marking the tenth anniversary of his death. Martin Freeman, Tamsin Greig, David Suchet, Jane Horrocks, Danny Dyer and Lee Evans are among the actors who have taken part.

Betrayal tells the story of two married couples and a seven-year extramarital affair and is inspired by Pinter’s affair with Joan Bakewell in the 1960s, while he was still married to Vivien Merchant and she to Michael Bakewell.

Hiddleston will play Robert, a role first played by Daniel Massey. Hiddleston said: “Betrayal is a masterpiece. Jamie Lloyd’s Pinter at the Pinter season is terrific and I am so pleased that he’s asked me to be part of it.

Pinter, awarded the Nobel prize for literature in 2005, is regarded as one of the finest, most influential and most provocative dramatists of his generation. The word Pinteresque – long pauses, hidden menace – even appears in the Oxford English Dictionary.

Hiddleston was last in the West End proper playing Coriolanus at the Donmar Warehouse in 2013 to 2014. Last September he was directed in Hamlet by Kenneth Branagh for three weeks only at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (Rada) 160-seat Jerwood Vanbrugh theatre. It raised money for Rada.

The Guardian’s critic Michael Billington, one of the few to see Hiddleston’s performance, praised the actor’s “ability to combine a sweet sadness with an incandescent fury. He suggests a fierce intellect gnawed by intense melancholy and yet subject to bouts of intemperate rage.

 



admin / November 11th, 2018

Collider – Loki’s not gone for good, folks. Word broke in September that Disney was making big plans for the good people at the Disney-owned Marvel Studios to be a part of Disney’s upcoming streaming service. Those plans were rumored to include a standalone Loki series with Tom Hiddleston reprising his role as the love-to-hate-him MCU character, and today Disney confirmed this is indeed the plan. Details are scant, but Disney said a live-action series centered around Loki, starring Tom Hiddleston, will debut on the streaming service—which now has a name: Disney+

When word first broke about these standalone series in September, the reports were that these shows were being envisioned as extensions of the existing MCU and could be limited or miniseries runs consisting of just a handful of episodes each, telling a complete story. That would gel with the busy schedules of actors like Hiddleston while also letting fans experience a movie-level MCU story in more of a longform format.

These Disney+ shows will differ from previous Marvel shows like Agents of S.H.I.E.LD. and Daredevilin one key regard: Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige will oversee the Disney+ Marvel shows, while the Netflix and ABC Marvel shows were overseen by Marvel TV’s Jeph Loeb. So don’t worry, we’re not in for another Inhumans-level disaster.

Other MCU actors rumored for their own standalone series include Elizabeth Olsen, who could get a limited Scarlet Witch run, and Anthony Mackie and Sebastian Stan who might be leading a Falcon/Winter Soldier series. The only show that has been confirmed is this Loki one for now, even though we still don’t know who’s writing, producing, or directing it.

That said, as Disney aims to launch Disney+ at the end of next year, they’re looking to bank as much content as possible that’ll be available when it launches. The live-action Star Wars show The Mandalorian is already filming, and today Disney announced that a Rogue One prequel series starring Diego Luna is also in the works. This is all in addition to an animated Monsters Inc. series and a live-action High School Musical series, as well as original feature films like the live-action Lady and the Tramp.

Buckle up, folks. #PeakTV ain’t seen nothin’ yet.



admin / March 26th, 2016

Click to view bigger image

Finding that broken feeling took a while, but when it came, just before midnight on the Louisiana set of “I Saw the Light,” Tom Hiddleston’s voice crawled into Hank Williams’ words as the blues played out slow and mournful to the hushed tune of a single guitar.

Hiddleston’s rendition of “Your Cheatin’ Heart” comes toward the end of writer-director Marc Abraham’s biopic, which opens Friday. A troubled man and a music legend, Williams, who died at 29 in 1953 after recording 30 Top 10 country music hits, left an indelible mark on American culture. Hiddleston, a British actor best known for his villain Loki in Marvel movies, said he felt the sting of torment and the weight of legacy in each song.

“It’s the hardest thing I’ve ever done,” said Hiddleston, who had to reinvent his inner musical rhythms and raise the pitch of his baritone to embody Williams’ tenor. “The moment I signed on I understood my duty to him and his family. You’ve got no choice but to throw your whole soul at it.”

Hiddleston traveled to Nashville and was coached by Rodney Crowell, a Grammy-winning country musician who introduced the actor not only to Williams’ music but to the work of bluesmen such as Jimmy Reed and Howlin’ Wolf. The two worked on blues chord progressions and how to get Hiddleston, whose British training had made him metronomically precise, to give the music air by hanging back slightly off the beat.

“Rodney used to say, ‘We’re shaking the Englishman out of you,'” said Hiddleston, who recalled their collaboration the other day as a white patio curtain lifted in the breeze and the faint sound of traffic drifted in from the Hollywood Hills. “I couldn’t have made it without Rodney. I needed a guide through the woods.”

Williams’ up-tempo songs, like “Hey, Good Lookin’,” and “Honky Tonkin’,” vibrated with coy fun and desire. But it was sparse and poetic ballads that earned Williams, who suffered back pain and was addicted to alcohol and drugs, the nickname “Hillbilly Shakespeare.” His voice could sound as if it had been through a storm; a bit of hurt pressing against the dawn with Alabama-inflected syllables that could curl a note back into a phrase or vanish.

In the years before his death, Williams, a former shipyard worker, seemed a man recounting defeats and laying bare his demons in a potent and beguiling mix of masculinity, stoicism and vulnerability. That raw plaintiveness transcended country music and inspired singers and songwriters including Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Tony Bennett, Norah Jones and Bruce Springsteen, who once said he wanted to crack Williams’ musical code to understand its “beautiful simplicity and its darkness and depth.”

In the film, Hiddleston as Williams, well into a night of boozing, explains to a writer the mood he evokes in songs such as “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry”: “Everybody has a little darkness in ’em,” he says. “Now, they may not like it. Don’t wanna know about it. But it’s there. … I’m talking about things like anger, misery, sorrow, shame, and they hear it. I show it to ’em. And they don’t have to take it home.”

Much of Williams’ singularity and heartbreak resonated in his voice, which could shift from somber to what Crowell called a “post-vaudeville yodel” that tested singers who tried to emulate him.

“Credit has to go to Tom’s work ethic. He’s a dedicated artist,” Crowell said of the 35-year-old Hiddleston. “Hank Williams was a yodeler and a blues singer, which is basically from the knees down and the neck up. Tom had to get hold of the mechanics of projecting his voice as a yodeler does. He had to break out of the trained Shakespeare actor chest voice and into the yodel. It’s a very difficult thing to master.”

The yodel warbled through “Lovesick Blues,” a song Crowell said was “a job for anybody.” Hiddleston did 62 takes of it in one day, which the actor said “felt like swimming in the ocean through seaweed and finally I was in clear water.” But the melancholy in “Your Cheatin’ Heart” was tough to personify. Hiddleston lived with the song for months but the magic didn’t arrive until late on a cold Friday night in Shreveport, La., after a long week of shooting.

“My voice sounded good and technically it was pleasing, but Rodney said he couldn’t hear the pain in it,” Hiddleston said. “He kept re-stating that it needed to be more painful, more aching, more mournful, more yearning.”

While the crew was setting up the shot, Hiddleston walked into a backyard. “The challenge of it was very solitary,” he said, “and I just went back inside and did it.”

Hiddleston did two takes with Crowell playing guitar off camera. The scene captured a man’s pain over a love lost and was an eerie glimpse at a life in spiral. After the last note was struck, Hiddleston, slipping into a Southern accent, remembered Crowell saying: “That’s it right there. You ain’t going to do no more. I’m going back to my hotel.”

“Tom put his butt on the line,” said Crowell, adding that he wanted to do the song live on the set to distill its intimacy. When Williams recorded it in 1952 he was months away from death. “It was one of the most beautiful performances Williams ever did. We had to capture the poignancy of that moment.”

Williams was rough, brash and unadorned. His early death, like those of other musicians including Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain and Amy Winehouse, left behind astonishing work and endless conjecture at what might have come with age. Williams wore his flaws in public, showing up drunk at performances and forcing the Grand Ole Opry, the pinnacle he aspired to for years, to drop him. He died of heart failure in the back seat of his Cadillac on his way to a New Year’s Day concert in Canton, Ohio.

“Hank was one of those people who lived without a safety net,” Hiddleston said. “They make compelling artists because they stand at the edge of a cliff and look down and are unafraid of the fall. That’s why they’re so captivating. But I do have that safety catch. The difference between me and him is I will step back.”

Source



admin / March 26th, 2016

The Night Manager is John Le Carré the way John Le Carré was meant to be done—with a bunch of sexy people.

Nothing says “John Le Carré adaptation” like Tom Hiddleston sprinting shirtless down a beach while a sultry voiceover whispers, Everyone is attracted to you. The Night Manager is a six-part adaptation of the John Le Carré novel by the same name, starting on April 19 and ending too soon for thirsty Hiddleston fans.

The Night Manager is full of fun spy stuff; sexy strangers (Elizabeth Debicki), sexy corrupt businessmen (Hugh Laurie), and sexy locales (Cairo, Matterhorn, assorted beaches). A colleague observed that some of the subtlety of the original novel has been lost in translation, but a few truly tense scenes make up for that. Plus, this is Hiddleston’s most Bond-y role yet.

Above all, The Night Manager is a fun show in a drought of fun shows. Watch it, then get to work on your own Hiddle-six-pack.

Via GQ



admin / October 8th, 2015

Tom Hiddleston is featured on the latest issue of Shortlist with a great article and new photoshoot!


Handsome, talented and a master of animals; is there no chink in Tom Hiddleston’s armour? Andrew Dickens has a good, hard look

Tom Hiddleston is about to leave the riverside flat where we’ve just photographed him with a cat on his shoulder. He picks up the guitar that’s been lying on the living room floor all day. I hadn’t realised it was his, so, considering he appears as Hank Williams in the forthcoming biopic I Saw The Light, I ask a prize-winning dumb question: do you play?

I mean to say, “Do you play in the film?” The polite way of asking, “Were you dubbed over by a more proficient country and western musician?” Hiddleston understands this and asks if we’d like to hear something: his own daft question. He whips out his Gibson (no euphemism) and delivers, to these ears, an emphatic Hank (again, no euphemism). It’s one way of answering a question, though – thankfully for the purposes of this interview, the rest of his responses are delivered more traditionally. Well, sort of, but we’ll come to that later.

This impromptu performance also proves that Hiddleston doesn’t do things by halves. He played the guitar before making I Saw The Light, but he wasn’t an alcoholic, womanising country legend. Work was required. The kind of work you’d pay to do.

“I’ve felt a huge responsibility to not screw it up,” the 34-year-old says. “I perhaps didn’t fully appreciate how iconic he is in the US until I arrived in Nashville. I went there six weeks before we were due to start shooting,” he says.

“I stayed with a musician called Rodney Crowell for five weeks and we sang and played every day, and he was amazing. Being in Nashville, being in the whole atmosphere of country blues music, the history – he loosened me up.

“There was one long night in the studio; we had to record some of the tracks ahead of time. Everyone was in a really good place and we didn’t want to stop and come back the next day, so Rodney got out a bottle of whiskey and said, ‘Here ya go, boys!’ and we kept singing and playing all night. That’s when I realised how privileged I am to do this job.”

Read Full Article



admin / October 6th, 2015

Tom Hiddleston has been named the first official ambassador for the BFI.

His new role will see him championing the British film industry at home and abroad, helping to build the next generation of homegrown talent.

Alongside his work in Hollywood blockbusters like Thor, The Avengers and War House, Hiddleston has also made time to champion British filmmakers, starring in films including Archipelago, The Deep Blue Sea and the upcoming High Rise, which is premiering at the BFI London Film Festival.

“Film is an art form – one of the most powerful, accessible, democratic and transformative in our society,” said Hiddleston. “It allows us to see the world around us, and the lives of others. It plays a vital role in establishing our national identity and gives us confidence as a nation. The BFI looks after the most significant collection of film and television in the world. It should be treasured and protected, in the same way we treasure and protect all our great cultural collections, from art and music, to libraries and museums. The BFI’s mission is to ensure that our film culture is kept alive, and to inspire the next generation of film talent. It’s the reason the BFI exists and why I am committed to being a BFI Ambassador.”

Source



admin / September 29th, 2015

Why does Tom Hiddleston keep saying “if” when discussing his possible return as Loki in the Marvel Cinematic Universe? He has done it a few times in recent interviews, most recently with MTV, who probed the actor about his approach to the villain in Marvel films past and present.

And again, Hiddleston kept it vague, mysterious and surprisingly non-committal. “If it ever happened again…” he begins a sentence in the interview with MTV News, before explaining how he’d try and change his interpretation of the wicked Asgardian. But Hiddleston sounds perplexed about how much Loki Marvel fans want in their Phase 3 movies, stating to the news outlet:

I never quite know whether people want to see him again or whether people want to move on… I can’t really take the temperature on it.

Guess what, Tom? People love Loki. They love him more than they love certain Avengers. (Yep, I’m looking at you, Hawkeye.) So far, Tom Hiddleston has helped turn Loki into the MCU’s most memorable villain, even though – admittedly – the competition hasn’t been that tough. Josh Brolin’s Thanos could change that. Please God, we hope that Brolin’s Thanos does change that. Because after years of teasing, and with a planned two-part battle coming up against him, Thanos has a lot on which he needs to deliver.

Back to Loki, and the confusion around Tom Hiddleston’s unwillingness to say, on the record, that he will return to the villainous role he made famous in two Thor movies and the first Avengers film. As far as we know, Loki is crucial to the plot of the next Thor sequel, Thor: Ragnarok. It is by Loki’s hand that Ragnarok, an apocalypse brought down on Asgard, begins. It’s possible that Marvel has different plans for its cinematic universe, and maybe they’ll have a different reason for the start of the cataclysmic war that we are expecting in Thor: Ragnarok. But when we left Loki at the end of The: The Dark World, he had tricked his brother (Chris Hemsworth) and had assumed the throne of Asgard. That’s a strange place to just leave a pivotal character like Loki, so I’d be willing to bet the farm that he will be back… and so will Hiddleston.

Source



Ads
Upcoming Appearances

Nothing currently

Gallery Images
010.JPG
011.JPG
006.JPG
007.JPG
008.JPG
009.JPG
003.JPG
004.JPG
005.JPG
002.JPG
001.JPG
013.jpg
Current Gif

Current Projects

Early Man (2018)
 
Tom as Lord Nooth (voice)
Set at the dawn of time, when prehistoric creatures and woolly mammoths roamed the earth, Early Man tells the story of Dug, along with sidekick Hognob as they unite his tribe against a mighty enemy Lord Nooth and his Bronze Age City to save their home.


Avengers: Infinity War (2018)
Tom as Loki
The Avengers and their allies must be willing to sacrifice all in an attempt to defeat the powerful Thanos before his blitz of devastation and ruin puts an end to the universe.

Elite Affiliates
Alicia Vikander Benedict Cumberbatch Brad Pitt Caitriona Balfe Carmen Electra Cara Delevingne Cate Blanchett Cate Blanchett Chris Evans Chris Pratt Dakota Fanning Eddie Redmayne Elle Fanning Emilia Clarke Felicity Jones Fergie Hayley Atwell Josh Duhamel Kaley Cuoco Kit Harington Luke Evans Matt Damon Michael Fassbender Sam Claflin Sam Heughan Sharon Stone Sophie Turner
Help Out & Donate

You and all the people can help here and any help would be more than appreciated. The goal is to be your number 1 source to Tom Hiddleston and for it, we need all the help you can give us. Anything you done will be creditted to you!

This site is always looking for pictures that we don't have up, so if you have scans, stills, shoots or any other picture that we could use, send to us. Full credits will be given.

Site Information

Owner: Anne
Name: Tom Hiddleston Fans
Domain: tom-hiddleston.org
Since: February 2013
Adopted Out: February 2017
Host: Free Fansite Hosting




Tom Hiddleston Fans (tom-hiddleston.org) is a non-profit fansite. It is not official and has no affiliation with Tom Hiddleston himself, his family, friends or anyone around him. All pictures, videos and other media are copyright to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is ever intended. If there is anything on this site that belongs to you and you'd like me to take down, please e-mail me and I will do so immediately.

Candids Policy

This fansite is strictly against any paparazzi or stalkerazzi pictures. We will not support any kind of bashing or privacy intrusion into Tom's life and/or the one of people around him. The gallery contains just paparazzi photos related to Tom's work, such as on-set photos and promotional related (arriving or leaving TV Shows...).